Cambridge Michigan Language Assessments

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Scores


ECCE

The listening section and grammar, vocabulary, and reading sections of the ECCE are scored electronically at CaMLA using an advanced mathematical model based on Item Response Theory that ensures the ability required to pass a section, or to receive a high score, remains the same from year to year.

Read more about scaled scoring in Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Scaled Scores on the ECCE.

The speaking and writing sections are graded according to rating scales established by CaMLA. The speaking ratings are assigned by trained raters who conduct the speaking section of the exam (see Speaking Test Examiner Qualifications). The writing ratings are assigned by raters trained and certified according to CaMLA standards. All writing responses are scored by at least two raters.

Test taker scores on the four sections of the exam are taken into consideration in determining who passes the exam and receives a certificate.

Procedures for Reporting Scores

ECCE section scores are reported in five bands. The levels of performance, from highest to lowest, are:

Scaled Score Per Section
Honors (H) 840-1000
Pass (P) 750-835
Low Pass (LP) 650-745
Borderline Fail (BF) 610-645
Fail (F) 0-605

Test takers who achieve an average score of 650 or higher will be awarded a certificate. Additionally, those who achieve a score of 840 or higher in all four sections will be awarded a Certificate of Competency with Honors. An ECCE qualification is valid for life.

Interpreting Your Scores

The Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) includes six common reference levels, ranging from basic user to master as defined by the Council of Europe (2001). The ECCE is aimed at the B2 (Vantage) level of the CEFR. Language users at this competency level:

Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialization. Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options. (Council of Europe, 2001: 24)

The ECCE estimates the test taker’s true competency by approximating the kinds of tasks that may be encountered in real life. Temporary factors, such as fatigue, anxiety, or illness, may affect exam results.

Rescoring

If you wish to have your ECCE rescored, a rescore request is available online.

  • You have up to one month after your test results have been issued to request a rescore
  • You will receive your rescore after the request has been processed


ECPE

The listening and grammar, cloze, vocabulary, and reading sections of the ECPE are scored electronically at CaMLA using an advanced mathematical model based on Item Response Theory that ensures the ability required to pass a section, or to receive a high score, remains the same from year to year.

Read more about scaled scoring in Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Scaled Scores.

The speaking and writing sections are graded according to rating scales established by CaMLA. The speaking ratings are assigned by trained raters who conduct the speaking section of the exam (see Speaking Test Examiner Qualifications). The writing ratings are assigned by raters trained and certified according to CaMLA standards. All writing responses are scored by at least two raters.

Test taker scores on the four sections of the exam are taken into consideration in determining who passes the exam and receives a certificate.

Procedures for Reporting Scores

ECPE test takers who achieve an average score of 650 or higher will be awarded a certificate. Additionally, those who achieve a score of 840 or higher in all four sections will be awarded a Certificate of Proficiency with Honors. An ECPE qualification is valid for life.

Scaled Score Per Section
Honors (H) 840-1000
Pass (P) 750-835
Low Pass (LP) 650-745
Borderline Fail (BF) 610-645
Fail (F) 0-605

The Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) includes six common reference levels, ranging from basic user to master as defined by the Council of Europe (2001). The ECPE is aimed at the C2 (Mastery) level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Language users at this proficiency level:

Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarise information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can express [themselves] spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations. (Council of Europe, 2001: 24)

Therefore, ECPE certificate holders are expected to be comfortable engaging with abstract ideas and concepts. They are interactive oral English speakers; they contribute to the development of a discussion, can generally understand conversational questions, can grasp both the gist and details of a conversation delivered in Standard American English, and can understand extended spoken discourse. They should also have a wide-ranging and flexible vocabulary as well as a sound grasp of English grammar. They can understand written materials that are encountered in both general and specialized professional contexts as well as in university-level reading. Additionally, they are able to communicate in standard written English with good expression and accuracy.

When interpreting an ECPE score report, it is important to remember that the ECPE estimates a test taker’s true proficiency by approximating the kinds of tasks that may be encountered in real life. Also, temporary factors unrelated to an test taker’s proficiency, such as fatigue, anxiety, or illness, may affect exam results.

Rescoring

If you wish to have your ECPE rescored, a rescore request is available online.

  • You have up to one month after your test results have been issued to request a rescore
  • You will receive your rescore after the request has been processed


MELAB

The listening and grammar, cloze, vocabulary, and reading (GCVR) sections of the MELAB are computer-scored. Each correct answer contributes to the final score for each section and there are no points deducted for wrong answers. A scaled score is calculated using an advanced mathematical model based on Item Response Theory that ensures the ability required to receive a particular score remains the same from year to year. The speaking and writing sections are graded by CaMLA certified examiners according to scales established by CaMLA. All essays are scored by at least two raters.

MELAB scores are reported on an official score report form. The score report provides the following information:

  • A score for each of the sections
  • The final MELAB score, which is the truncated average of the scores for the writing, listening, and GCVR sections
  • Speaking test score for test takers who opted for this part of the test
  • Additional comments about the test performance (where this is relevant)

The score ranges for each MELAB section are:

Section Range Notes
Writing 0-97
Listening 0-100
GCVR 0-100
Speaking 1-4 May include + or –
Final MELAB 0-99 Average of writing, listening, and GCVR scores

There is no official passing score on the MELAB. However, different institutions and organizations that accept MELAB scores may require certain minimum scores for their purposes. For example:

  • One undergraduate program at a state university requires a minimum final MELAB score of between 80 and 85, with no part score below 80 (the final MELAB score is a truncated average of parts 1, 2, and 3)
  • Another undergraduate program at a community college requires a minimum final MELAB score of 75

Score Reporting

Once scoring is complete, you will automatically receive one unofficial copy of your MELAB score report, issued by the test center where your MELAB was administered. Official MELAB score reports will be sent to up to two universities or institutions that you listed at the bottom of the Official Identification Form before taking the test. These two reports and your copy of the score report are included in the test fee.

Sending Your MELAB Scores to Universities or Institutions

CaMLA sends all official MELAB score reports directly to the universities/institutions. Your student copy of your score report is not considered official and valid. To ensure your scores reach your requested locations:

  • List the universities or institutions at the bottom of the identification form before the test (two score reports are free, but only if you list them on the form before the test)
  • If after the exam you want more than two score reports sent, you can purchase additional score reports online.
  • List the name and the complete address of the school to which you want to have scores sent (if you do not know the admissions office’s complete address, contact the university you are applying to and get the information from them)

Remember

  • Do not send the score report to the institution yourself
  • Make sure that the school(s) you are applying to accept MELAB scores as evidence of English language proficiency
  • Additional score reports ordered after the test cost extra (view pricing)
  • If you have taken the test more than once, only the most recent score will be sent
  • Speaking test scores cannot be carried over to subsequent test scores
  • Scores over two years old cannot be sent

You can order extra score reports by fax or mail, but you must include a copy of your score report. If you have any problems with your scores being accepted, contact us and we will send the institution further information on the MELAB and help the admissions officers interpret the MELAB scores.

Results Processing

Normal results processing typically is as follows:

  • After MELAB test papers are received at CaMLA, allow 4 to 6 weeks for grading and preparing score reports
  • Another 5 to 10 days must be allowed for mail service
  • Total turnaround time, from the time you take the MELAB until the time you receive your results, will be 6 to 8 weeks.

Rush Service

Rush service is available for the reporting of scores only, not for test registration. Rush scores must be ordered at the time of the test; they are sent to institutions only, not to test takers. Rush Service costs an additional fee (view pricing). The rush fee must be paid at the time of the test; you may not request rush service after your answer sheets have been mailed to CaMLA.

Payment of the rush fee gives your test the following priority handling:

  • Test takers may pay a fee for rush service, which guarantees that official score reports will be shipped to institutions designated by the test taker approximately 7 business days following CaMLA’s complete receipt of all test materials from the test center. Unofficial score reports will be shipped at the same time.

To receive rush service, you must make the payment to your test center (not CaMLA). Your test center will notify us that you have selected rush service.

Rescoring

If you wish to have your exam rescored, you can order a rescore request online.

  • You have up to one month after your test results have been issued to request a rescore
  • You will receive your rescore from CaMLA once we have processed the request


MET

All test takers are required to record their answers to the paper-and-pencil test on specially designed answer sheets, which are then automatically scanned. Each correct answer carries equal weight within each section and there are no points deducted for wrong answers. Test takers receive a scaled score with a maximum of 80 for sections I and II, and a final score for these two sections; the final score is the total of the two sections. Scores for the speaking test are reported separately, also on a scale of 0–80.

Scaled Score

The MET does not have a pass score. Your scaled score is calculated using an advanced mathematical model based on Item Response Theory. The scaled scores are not percentages. They do not show how many items you answered correctly, but rather where you stand on the language ability scale. This ensures that test scores are comparable across different administrations and fair to all test takers, regardless of when they took the test. (See Interpreting MET Scaled Scores in Relation to the Common European Framework Levels)

Results

MET scores represent a test taker’s English language proficiency at the time the test was taken and are valid as long as the test taker’s level of proficiency does not change. Because language proficiency can increase or decrease over time, score users are advised to consider the test taker’s experience with English since the time of the test administration as well as the test scores themselves.

Each person who takes the MET receives a CaMLA score report and has the option to purchase a certificate of achievement.

  • The score report includes test taker details and the scaled score for each section of the test, ranging from 0 to 80
  • A score report includes a final score, which is the total of the listening and reading sections of the test
  • The speaking score is not included in the final score; rather, it is reported separately on the score report
  • The optional MET Certificate of Achievement includes the same information as the score report and professionally presents it for the purposes of display
  • A certificate of achievement (available from March 2015) can be ordered from your local test center or from CaMLA anytime within four months of your test date

Interpreting Your Results

The MET is a multi-level exam, covering a range of proficiency levels from upper beginner to lower advanced. The levels of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) aimed at by the MET are A2 to C1, with emphasis on the middle of the range (B1 and B2). The exact cut scores between adjacent CEFR levels, based on research conducted by CaMLA, are available in Interpreting MET Scaled Scores in Relation to the Common European Framework Levels, where selected CEFR performance descriptors illustrate what examinees should be able to do at each level.

Score ranges for the CEFR levels are provided for each section but not for the final score, because it is possible for a test taker to be at a higher language proficiency level in one language skill than in another. Therefore, section scores should be taken into account when interpreting the test results for use in decision making.

When interpreting MET results, remember:

  • The MET estimates a test taker’s true proficiency by approximating the kinds of tasks that may be encountered in real life
  • Temporary factors unrelated to a test taker’s proficiency, such as fatigue, anxiety, or illness, may affect exam results


YLTE

Procedures for Reporting Scores

The center where a child takes the test sends the completed test booklets to a team of trained raters, who score them carefully. To make sure that each child gets the fairest possible result, all tests are checked twice. In most parts of the test, spelling has to be correct. Both British and American English spellings are accepted.

YLTE medals

The speaking examiner scores the speaking test, and then speaking scores—along with the completed listening and reading and writing test booklets—are returned to CaMLA.

Interpreting YLTE Results

Each test taker receives a certificate that shows how many medals he or she earned. The maximum score is five medals for each part of the test. A result of one medal means the child can improve significantly in that skill; five medals means that the child did very well in that skill and answered most questions correctly. With a total of 10 medals or more, a test taker should be ready to start preparing for the next CaMLA YLTE exam.

The table below provides a summary of the type of language activity that Young Learners at each level are likely to be able to accomplish.

Listening Speaking Reading Writing
Bronze CAN understand simple sentences about things around them CAN respond to personal questions on topics such as age, family and their home CAN recognize the letters of the alphabet CAN write the letters of the alphabet and spell their name and simple words
Silver CAN understand when somebody talks about their family or friends in simple sentences CAN ask somebody about how they are and what they like doing and answer similar questions CAN understand simple stories and shorter texts with the help of pictures and drawings CAN continue a story or text that has been started in English or add words that are missing
Gold CAN understand audio and video clips used in the English lesson CAN talk about a problem in simple terms CAN understand longer texts about everyday topics, even if they do not know all the words CAN write a short message on a postcard or in an email


CEFR prof-cert-cefr-equivalence

CaMLA exams are aligned to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), published by the Council of Europe. The CEFR provides a common basis for the elaboration of language syllabi, examinations, and textbooks.

Many educators find the CEFR useful in that it describes, in a comprehensive way, what language learners have to learn to do in order to use a language effectively for communication.

The CEFR describes language ability on a scale of levels from A1 for beginners up to C2 for those who have mastered a language. This makes it easy for anyone involved in language teaching and testing (learners, teachers, teacher trainers, etc.) to see the level of different qualifications. It also means that employers and educational institutions can easily compare qualifications and see how they relate to exams they already know in their own country.

 

 

CEFR Levels

Level Description
C2
Mastery
  • Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read
  • Can summarize information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation
  • Can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in more complex situations
C1
Effective Operational Proficiency
  • Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts and recognize implicit meaning
  • Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions
  • Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic, and professional purposes
  • Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed texts on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organizational patterns, connectors, and cohesive devices
B2
Vantage
  • Can understand the main idea of complex texts on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialization
  • Can interact with native speakers quite possibly without strain for either party
  • Can produce clear, detailed texts on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options
B1
Threshold
  • Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.
  • Can deal with most situations likely to arise while traveling in an area where the language is spoken
  • Can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest
  • Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes, and ambitions, and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans
A2
Waystage
  • Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g., very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, and employment)
  • Can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters
  • Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment, and matters in areas of immediate need
A1
Breakthrough
  • Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type
  • Can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has
  • Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help