Cambridge Michigan Language Assessments

Shaping English Language Assessments
with Research + Experience

An intern’s words: Suthathip Thirakunkovit
June 24, 2013
Categories: Internships

CaMLA’s internship program provides professional training and research opportunities for English language teaching and assessment professionals and graduate students. This is the second of three pieces we are posting about how our 2013 interns are getting along during their time at CaMLA. We asked them to provide us with a few words about their impressions after a month in the office.

Ploy Thirakunkovit

Ploy Thirakunkovit

Originally from Bangkok, Thailand, Suthathip Thirakunkovit—who prefers to go by Ploy—attends Purdue University, where she’s a PhD student in second language studies. Here’s what Ploy wrote about her experience at CaMLA to date.

It was Thursday, March 7, 2013, when I received good news from CaMLA’s Assessment Director Natalie Chen and Research Director Jayanti Banerjee that I was given an internship position at CaMLA. To be honest, receiving an offer from such a well-recognized company was an extremely exciting feeling for me. Part of the reason is that I might not have lots of opportunities to get involved in the test-development process while I was studying. I therefore feel that gaining this summer internship would be a valuable hands-on experience that can help me become a professional language tester in the future.

I entered the program on May 28. On that day, I met my supervisor, Assessment Manager Mark Chapman, who is absolutely fantastic and supportive. He has given me a motivating list of milestones to achieve during the internship. This includes learning how to do test reviews, select test items, and compile them. Concerning the tasks that I have at hand, it is interesting to discover that something I was taught in school can actually be applied in real life. More importantly, I learn a lot from my mistakes as well. However, my supervisor and everyone else at CaMLA have so kindly given me advice of how to change or correct them. Actually, the work at CaMLA itself is interesting. But, by talking with other people in the organization, and then exchanging ideas, I have also received lots of different perspectives and new ideas that I can later use for my own research and study.

Finally, I would like to say thank you to Natalie and Jay for giving me this great opportunity to work with many language testing experts in a friendly atmosphere. Also, I can’t forget to thank all my colleagues at CaMLA who have always been very helpful and supportive both inside and outside work. You guys are awesome.

  • Pin It